1.  

  2. "I believe in fiction and the power of stories because that way we speak in tongues. We are not silenced. All of us, when in deep trauma, find we hesitate, we stammer; there are long pauses in our speech. The thing is stuck. We get our language back through the language of others. We can turn to the poem. We can open the book. Somebody has been there for us and deep-dived the words."
    — Jeanette Winterson (via fangirlingthebook)

    (Source: observando, via theashleyclements)

     

  3. "Yeah, I’ve read Name of the Wind!"
    —  Seven words to make a woman love you (via kingkillerarchives)

    (Source: tanoraqui, via kingkillerarchives)

     
  4. medallionmediagroup:

    book crafty vol. III

    This makes me what to go back to year 12 art again

    (via theashleyclements)

     

  5. WHEN A BELOVED CHARACTER WON’T STOP MAKING TERRIBLE CHOICES

    dukeofbookingham:

    I’m just like:

    image

    (via figmentdotcom)

     
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  8. "When men imagine a female uprising, they imagine a world in which women rule men as men have ruled women."
    — 

    Sally Kempton

    It’s been apparent to me for a while that most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted.

    I cannot decide whether this shows how unimaginative they are, or shows how aware they must be of what they do in order to so deeply fear having it turned on them. (via lepetitmortpourmoi)

    "Most men can’t really imagine “equality.”  All they can imagine is having the existing power structure inverted." (via misandry-mermaid)

    (Source: yourenotsylviaplath, via theashleyclements)

     

  9. "Congratulations, that was the stupidest thing I’ve ever seen. Ever."
    — Master Elodin, The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (via kingkillerarchives)

    (Source: oberons-puck, via kingkillerarchives)

     
  10. mymodernmet:

    15-year-old photographer Zev Hoover creates a wonderfully imaginative world by photographing regular-sized backgrounds and scenes and then shrinking his subjects down to miniature sizes.

    (via figmentdotcom)